When can you expect a digital ‘smart meter?’

When Labor Day ended, nearly a decade of hard work began as ComEd initiated the long process of installing digital “smart meters” across its service territory of more than 4 million customers. The meters are part of ComEd’s $3 billion plan to modernize its power grid.

ComEd smart meter deployment mapSo when will you get one? The deployment began this month in Chicago’s near western suburbs and will continue through 2021. (Click to see a larger image of ComEd’s smart meter deployment map.)

The process of replacing an old analog meter with a new digital meter takes only about 10 minutes, and may involve a brief power outage. ComEd will alert you by letter, bill insert, automated phone call, and a knock on the door before installing a new meter. Also, the utility will hang a sign on your door to let you know a new meter has been installed.

The benefits of smart meters include the elimination of estimated billing, increased reliability, reduced utility inefficiencies and more access to pricing programs that save consumers money. CUB will monitor the deployment closely to make sure consumers receive the benefits of the new meters, and not just the bill. (Read more about the new meters in CUB’s past blog post.) 

Are you looking forward to getting a new electric meter? Take CUB’s three-question smart meter survey.

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About Patrick Deignan

CUB Communications and Media Planner
This entry was posted in Electric bills, Energy, Saving Money. Bookmark the permalink.

18 Responses to When can you expect a digital ‘smart meter?’

  1. Bob Flanary says:

    Smart meters are the final nail in the coffin for the coal plants. Midwest Generation is in bankruptcy but is working behind the scenes to get Waukegan, the state and/or Lake County to pay them to convert to some other kind of generation facility. Don’t let them get away with it. Let’s make sure they don’t finagle their way into getting some kind of aggregation deal or some kind of tax break or other form of corporate welfare. Shut them down.

  2. Pingback: How do Illinois consumers feel about smart meters? |

  3. Anonymous says:

    Amen, Karen I agree.

  4. Renea Lopez says:

    I opted out of this sham program in 2008. The smart technology program is an absolute lie, do an internet search on the subject matter. I also have a pace maker and will not allow this dangerous meter (microwave) to be installed. By 2014 I will be off the grid through alternative energy use. I will not sell my energy to the cabal controlled energy cartel.

    • Anonymous says:

      Would love to know what you are doing? Would like to do the same.

    • Ken says:

      If you are concerned about smart meter radiation, you should first get rid of your cell phone, cordless phone, WI-Fi, Bluetooth, microwave oven and R/C toys.

      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-h-bailey/smart-meters-dumb-science_b_2768405.html

      “Smart meters only transmit data for roughly 1.4 seconds per day, at very low wattage. And even if one stands less than one meter (3 feet) from a smart meter when it broadcasts its data, the resulting microwave exposure is 550 times less than standing in front of an active microwave oven, and 1100 times less than holding an active cell phone to one’s ear.”

      • Anonymous says:

        It is not just about radiation, it is about control. Don’t you read the internet and what the world has to say about the New World Order and the Illuminati? Check it out.

  5. Anonymous says:

    How about all the stuff you can read on line about these smart meters – where people are getting from them, there has been lawsuits filed because there is nothing in place for privacy and how anyone can see your usage and how ComEd will know everything that is going on in your house? Why are you not saying anything about all the stuff that has been posted onthe internet?

    • Ken says:

      And of course if it’s on the internet, you should believe it. The internet is full of conspiracy theories. Many years ago Paul Brodeur wrote books about the dangers of microwaves and even ordinary power lines. He said you should worry about microwave towers (and now, cell phone towers). You should worry about the electricity in your house, even without a smart meter. Even before smart meters, some say the government has ways of targeting your thoughts. Smart meters are here to stay. You need to defend yourself. Start wearing a tinfoil hat. Or better yet – get a QuWave Defender. http://www.quwave.com/

      • Anonymous says:

        What power company do you work for, Ken. While your privacy is unimportant to you mine is important to me. I wonder about my power company being sued and passing the costs on to me & other customers because of this easily hacked system. Companies have to pass the expense of their mistakes onto their customers which is their source of income they have.

      • Ken says:

        Here are some more tips. Besides the tinfoil hat, you should hang foil space blankets over your windows to block the microwaves, and avoid spring mattresses.
        http://www.montalk.net/conspiracy/55

    • Ken says:

      Smart meters don’t tell ComEd anything about what’s going on in your house – just the total power going into your house. There’s no way a smart meter can spy on you. If anyone is spying on you, it’s the NSA snooping your emails and phone calls. Or how about the cable companies – they know what TV shows you watch. Google tracks every website you go to.

      A good way to avoid all these hazards is to move into an Amish community. Get rid of electricity, phones, and internet.

  6. I used time of day pricing many years ago. A smart meter is NOT a requirement. As an electrical engineer myself, I am suspicious of forced introduction of technology without adequate information ahead of time.

    • Ken Lundgren says:

      How did you use time of day pricing without a smart meter?
      I have also used it (ComEd calls it Real Time Pricing) since 2009, but it did require a new digital meter. Is that the same as a smart meter?

      • Great question, Ken. The new meters are similar to those used by real-time pricing customers, but they communicate with the utility differently. So even if you’re on real-time pricing, you will still get a new electric meter, and you can stay on real-time pricing. Let us know if you have any other questions.

  7. dawn says:

    when will elmwood park il so new meters?

  8. Karen Miller says:

    Com Ed put a new smart meter on my house about 3 years ago and never gave me any kind of notification they were doing so. Will they really give all those notices to other people? They pretty much do what ever they want to and do not care about peoples thoughts!!

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